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A common polymorphism near PER1 and the timing of human behavioral rhythms.


AUTHORS

Lim AS , Chang AM , Shulman JM , Raj T , Chibnik LB , Cain SW , Rothamel K , Benoist C , Myers AJ , Czeisler CA , Buchman AS , Bennett DA , Duffy JF , Saper CB , De Jager PL , . Annals of neurology. 2012 9 ; 72(3). 324-34

ABSTRACT

Circadian rhythms influence the timing of behavior, neurological diseases, and even death. Rare mutations in homologs of evolutionarily conserved clock genes are found in select pedigrees with extreme sleep timing, and there is suggestive evidence that certain common polymorphisms may be associated with self-reported day/night preference. However, no common polymorphism has been associated with the timing of directly observed human behavioral rhythms or other physiological markers of circadian timing at the population level.


Circadian rhythms influence the timing of behavior, neurological diseases, and even death. Rare mutations in homologs of evolutionarily conserved clock genes are found in select pedigrees with extreme sleep timing, and there is suggestive evidence that certain common polymorphisms may be associated with self-reported day/night preference. However, no common polymorphism has been associated with the timing of directly observed human behavioral rhythms or other physiological markers of circadian timing at the population level.


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